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Brewing Coffee

Get The Most Out of Every Brew
At Gaviña, we make sure every batch of coffee we ship has been roasted to perfection. Once it reaches your business, the rest is up to you. Here’s how to brew coffee for a satisfying experience every time. 

Striking the Right Balance
Get the coffee-to-water ratio right by using at least 2.5 ounces of coffee for each 64 ounces of water during brewing. Measure accurately, and don’t skimp on the coffee grounds. We’ve got plenty more where those came from!

In a properly brewed cup of coffee, the amount of actual coffee solids should be between 1 and 1.5 percent. This is referred to as the strength. Since coffee is mostly water, make sure that the water used in brewing is fresh, with no odor or visible impurities. Don’t use tap water or distilled water. Get more information on the ideal water composition with SCAA's Water Guidelines.

The amount of soluble solids dissolved out of the coffee beans during brewing is referred to as the “extraction.” You are aiming for 18-22 percent. Too little extraction makes coffee taste like grass or peanuts. Too much makes it taste bitter and astringent. Just right makes the perfect brew.

Four Basics of a Good Automatic Brew

  1. For a 64 oz. brew, calibrate your automatic brewer to a 4-6 minute brew cycle and use a drip grind.
  2. The brewing equipment must be clean and properly maintained. The filter should be fresh and appropriately matched to the equipment.
  3. The water temperature should be accurate and consistent (195°-205° F). The spray head must be unclogged for even wetting of the grounds and turbulence (mixing) of the water and coffee grounds during brewing for proper extraction.
  4. Hold the coffee at a steady temperature between 175°-185°F in a closed, insulated container. Never leave it sitting on the heat, and don’t reheat it after it has gone cold. The flavor will be ruined. Brew a fresh batch instead.

There are many factors that can impact the brewing in an automatic drip coffee maker. Test the coffee in batches throughout the day and make adjustments to the grind, the water temperature, the brew time, and the coffee to water ratio as necessary.

General Manual Pour-over Brewing Instructions
The following steps are general instructions for making manual pour-over coffee. However, the barista or will have to vary his or her individual brewing technique to achieve the desired brew strength.

  • Grind your coffee on the medium standard drip setting immediately before brewing. If the resulting beverage is too weak, use a finer grind. If the water forms a pool on top of the bed of grounds, it means your grind is too fine, so use a courser grind.
  • Open the filter and place it in the brewer.
  • Rinse the filter with hot water to prevent any "papery" taste.
  • Measure the correct amount of coffee into the filter. Use one coffee scoop for each 5 oz. of hot water.
  • Pour water that is just off the boil (195 to 205 degrees Fahrenheit) over the entire bed of grounds using a light, steady stream of hot water to wet the grounds.
  • Start at the center of the grounds and pour gently in a circular motion moving to the outer rim until all of the grounds are wet. As the grounds become wet, the coffee will "bloom."
  • Wait approximately 15 to 20 seconds, and then pour the remaining water slowly and evenly over the grounds.
  • This entire process will take approximately 2 to 2.5 minutes.
  • Carefully remove the filter with the spent grounds and serve immediately. (Use caution while handling the hot coffee grounds.)

French Press Brewing Instructions
The following steps are general instructions for making French press coffee. However, the operator or will have to vary his or her individual brewing technique to achieve the desired brew strength.

  • Weigh and then grind your coffee beans using a medium-course grind.
  • Set your timer to 3 -1/2 minutes. The finer the grind, the lesser the brew time; and the courser the grind, the greater the brew time.
  • As with any brewing method, it's important to use freshly roasted, freshly ground, high-quality coffee and good tasting water.
  • The Specialty Coffee Association's guidelines recommend that you use water that's been heated to a temperature between 195 degrees Fahrenheit to 205 degrees Fahrenheit (92 degrees to 96 degrees Celsius).
  • Pre-heat the French press's glass or thermal container by rinsing it with hot water and discard the hot water.
  • Set your timer. (The amount of time you allow the water to contact the ground coffee in the glass container depends on the size of the grind and water temperature. Start by steeping the water and grounds for 4 to 5 minutes).
  • Place your carefully measured coffee grounds in the French press's glass or thermal container.
  • Pour the water over the grounds evenly in a circular motion so they circulate freely within the container.
  • A bloom will form at the top of the brew. The size of the bloom will vary depending on the type and freshness of the coffee.
  • After 15 to 20 seconds, gently stir the bloom to blend the coffee grounds and water. This will help the water to extract the flavor components evenly from all the grounds. Remove the spoon and set aside.
  • Set the lid on the press. Place your hand on the plunger handle and gently press down until the filter in the lid sits just below the surface of the coffee. This keeps the grounds submerged within the water.
  • When your timer sounds, gently and firmly press on the plunger handle down.
  • Serve immediately.

Brewing Equipment Cleaning Basics

  • Your manual and automatic brewing equipment needs to be cleaned often and thoroughly in order to make produce consistent and great-tasting batches of coffee.
  • Proper cleaning and maintenance also help prolong the life of your equipment.
  • Over time, mineral deposits will form in your automatic brewer's boiler. Even though these deposits are not visible, they can prevent your brewer from operating correctly as well as damage the metal. Consult the manufacturer's operations manual for cleaning, sanitizing, and routine maintenance instructions.

Coffee Holding Equipment
It's important to keep your glass carafes and thermal holding devices sparkling clean inside and out. Otherwise, your coffees' natural oils will build up and give your fresh coffee a stale, rancid taste.

Cleaning Glass Carafes (Decanters)
Use a cleaning solution formulated especially for glass carafes and follow the directions on the package. Or follow these easy steps:

  1. Prepare a mild solution of dish detergent and warm water or use a cleaning solution formulated especially for glass carafes
  2. Wipe the exterior with a sponge or moist cloth to remove the dried coffee, water spots, and dirt
  3. Remove the lid and clean the inside the carafe or airpot liner with your detergent solution (wear rubber gloves) or with a long-handed brush or sponge
  4. Thoroughly rinse the lid and carafe with clean warm water
  5. Dry and re-assemble 

Cleaning Insulated Carafes & Thermal Airpots 
Use a cleaning solution formulated especially for thermal carafes and airpots follow the directions on the package. Or follow these easy steps:

  1. Prepare a mild solution of dish detergent and warm water or use a cleaning solution formulated especially for insulated coffee brewing equipment.
  2. Wipe the exterior with a sponge or moist cloth to remove the dried coffee, water spots, and dirt.
  3. Remove the lid and clean the inside the carafe or airpot liner with your detergent solution (wear rubber gloves) or with a long-handed brush or sponge.
  4. Thoroughly rinse the lid and carafe with clean warm water.
  5. Dry and re-assemble. 

Regular Maintenance
Like your automobile, your automatic coffee machine needs routine maintenance by a skilled technician to keep it running smoothly. Regular maintenance will also help extend the life of the coffee equipment and prevent it from breaking down. Contact us to find out more about our maintenance and service programs for businesses in our local service area.